Author Archives: Jens

Super Blood Wolf Moon

We were treated to a spectacular total lunar eclipse this evening. The moon was at its closest point to the Earth so it was a super moon. Since it was a total lunar eclipse it was a blood moon. Because it was the year’s first full moon it was also a wolf moon. I took this photo during the total lunar eclipse with a telephoto lens.

Posted in British Columbia, Night Photography, Science, West Coast, Winter | 2 Comments

Northern Saw-whet Owl

This morning I spotted a Northern Saw-whet Owl ( Aegolius acadicus ) sleeping in a conifer tree. Owls are generally nocturnal predators, with hooked bills, needle-sharp talons, large eyes and facial discs. The Northern Saw-whet Owl can be found year round in this area and they hunt rodents from perches. It’s one of the smallest owl species in North America.

Posted in Birds, British Columbia, Science, West Coast, Wildlife, Winter | Leave a comment

Frozen In Time

I enjoyed photographing this combination of fresh snow and ice. Clutter kills pictures—a good photographer is a master of exclusion. Clean, simple, graphic compositions work best with ice photography. Keep simplicity as your mantra when shooting ice.

Posted in British Columbia, Waterfalls, West Coast, Winter | Leave a comment

Beautiful B.C.

The province of British Columbia contains so much natural beauty. I used my drone to create this video. In the lower right hand corner is a button that allows you to view the video full screen. There is another icon in the lower right hand corner that looks like a ‘gear’. Here you can select the resolution and 720p seems to work best. There is also music which makes the video more enjoyable to watch. Comments are always welcome.

Posted in Autumn, British Columbia, Drone, Inspiring, Travel, Waterfalls, West Coast, Wildlife | Leave a comment

The Mink – Mustela vison

This morning I was photographing Bald Eagles when I spotted a Mink scurrying between large pieces of driftwood in a wetlands area. Minks are dark brown in colour and they have a long bushy tail. Their fur is dense and lustrous and serves as insulation even in water. Despite not having webbed feet, they swim well. They’re very efficient hunters and will often attack much larger prey. They eat birds, fish, crustaceans, small mammals and amphibians. This Mink ran right up to me and very close to the legs of my tripod. It showed no fear and I was kind of startled by how bold it was as it investigated the human photographer. They are tricky to get a photo of because they are constantly in motion.

The American Mink – Mustela vison
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Majestic Bird of Prey

In late November Bald Eagle’s gather near certain rivers to feed on salmon that die after spawning. I was fortunate to experience some beautiful light when taking these images. Click on any photo to open the gallery and then use the navigation arrows. Comments are always welcome.

Posted in Autumn, Birds, British Columbia, Inspiring, Science, West Coast, Wildlife | Leave a comment

Hooded Merganser

The Hooded Merganser ( Lophodytes cucullatus ) is the smallest of the three species of mergansers found in North America. The Hooded Merganser finds its prey underwater by sight, the dictating membrane (third eyelid) is clear and acts to protect the eye during swimming, just like a pair of goggles. They are extremely agile swimmers and divers but awkward on land because their legs are set far back on the body. They can be found year round in British Columbia. The bird in the photo is a male with a crest that shows a large white patch. Click on the image to see a larger version.

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Trumpeter Swan

The Trumpeter Swan ( Cygnus buccinator ) is the largest waterfowl species native to North America. It is entirely white except for its bill, legs and feet. It spends winters in western British Columbia and feeds on aquatic plants. In the 1950’s a large population of these birds were found in Alaska and today their population is estimated at close to 16,000. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Posted in Autumn, Birds, British Columbia, Science, West Coast, Wildlife | Leave a comment

Soggy Bald Eagle

I was looking through some images I took last winter and I came across this photo of a rain soaked bald eagle. I like this image because the bald eagle is making eye contact with me and you can see its sharp and powerful talons. The bald eagle may not look its best due to the rain, but it shows this beautiful bird of prey in its element during harsh conditions. Click on the image to see a larger version.

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Long-billed Dowitcher

I was fortunate to spend some time this morning with a flock of Long-billed Dowitcher’s ( Limnodromus scolopaceus ). Their bills are full of nerve endings, which are useful for sensing prey. They walk along slowly lifting their heads up and down like a sewing machine.

Posted in Autumn, Birds, British Columbia, Science, West Coast, Wildlife | Leave a comment